Contact: 073 777 4434 Email: mzukona@nyakaza.org.za

REMEMBER Robert Mangaliso Sobukwe!

• He studied at Fort Hare University for tertiary university.
• Sobukwe was never interested in politics. His study of Native Administration aroused his interest.
• Sobukwe together with his friends launched a publication in 1948 titled “Beware Topics” a publication that critiqued the Native Representative Council and the Native Advisory Board.
• He joined the African National Congress Youth League (ANCYL) in 1948.
•In 1949 he was elected as the Student Representative Council (SRC) president of the Fort Hare.
• He became the secretary of the ANCYL in 1949.
•Sobukwe was inspired by the writings of Anton Lambede which made him adopt an Africanist approach
•Robert Sobukwe and Veronica Mathe were united in matrimony in 1950.
• In 1950 Sobukwe taught History, English and Geography at Jandrell Secondary School in Standerton.
• He later moved to Johannesburg in 1954 and settled in Mofolo, Soweto.
•He was the lecture at the University of the Witwatersrand teaching African studies.
•In the year 1957 he became the editor of the ‘Africanist.’
• Sobukwe was an Africanist who believed that the future of South Africa should be in the hands of black South Africans.
•He left the ANC and formed the Pan Africanist Congress (PAC).
•In the year 1957 he became the editor of the ‘Africanist.’
•Sobukwe was an Africanist who believed that the future of South Africa should be in the hands of black South Africans.
•He left the ANC and formed the Pan Africanist Congress (PAC).
• 6th April 1959, during PAC’s congress, he got elected as its first president.
• In December 1959, PAC declared that it would also do a campaign that would be against the famous pass laws. The aim of the campaign was to ensure that the country attained its freedom within the four years that would follow.
• The Sharpeville Massacre On 21st March 1960 , 69 people were killed 180 injured at a march.
• Sobukwe, and some of the people in the campaign were arrested for claims of sedition.
• 3rd May 1963 the South African legislature ratified an Act which they called the ‘Sobukwe Clause’. This clause authorised the Minister of Justice to extend the prison sentence of any inmate sentenced for political reasons , however The clause swas specifically aimed at keeping the Sobukwe in jail (as also later admitted by the government). Thus after a three-year sentence, he “was actually detained for a further six years on the annual decision of the Parliament”.